Today's Veterinary Nurse

SEP-OCT 2017

Practical, peer reviewed, state-of-the-art companion animal nursing and technical educational articles with CE. Promotes better health for animals and career growth and development for veterinary technicians and veterinary assistants.

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PEER REVIEWED TODAY'S VETERINARY TECHNICIAN | September/October 2017 | 49 Shutterstock/Tatiana Katsa 1 Credit Continuing Education | Peer Reviewed Kriste has been working in the veterinary field in and around Sacramento, California, since 1997. After receiving her RVT in 1999, she began working in emergency and holistic medicine, which sparked her interest in the human–animal bond and quality-of-life focus in veterinary medicine. In 2008 she received her veterinary technician specialist certification in oncology, and since then has lectured around the United States on various topics related to cancer and compassionate care. She has been working as the Medical Oncology Supervisor at the University of California, Davis, since 2010. Kriste Sears-Sein, RVT, VTS (Oncology) University of California, Davis M E E T T H E A U T H O R CONTINUING EDUCATION Lymphoma (more properly termed lymphosarcoma) is a cancer of lymphocytes that affects approximately 13 to 24 dogs per 100,000 annually and accounts for up to 24% of all canine neoplasias in the United States. 1 It is characterized by an abnormal population of lymphocytes, which are an important part of the immune system. B lymphocytes (or B cells) produce antibodies in response to specific antigens. These antibodies "lock on" to the antigen, thus marking it for destruction by the T lymphocytes (or T cells). The determination of cell origin as B cell or T cell gives important predictive information on response and survival times in lymphoma patients. Lymphoma usually arises in lymphoid tissues, such as the lymph nodes, spleen, and bone marrow, but can be found anywhere in the body. Multicentric lymphoma, which involves multiple lymph nodes and may also affect the spleen, liver, and/or bone marrow, accounts for approximately 80% of canine lymphoma cases. DIAGNOSIS Patients with multicentric lymphoma often present with only the clinical sign of enlarged peripheral lymph nodes; however, a patient may present with any number of nonspecific clinical signs, such as lethargy, weight loss, anorexia, or polyuria/polydipsia. Other differential diagnoses for generalized lymphadenopathy include fungal, viral, bacterial, or parasitic infections, and a thorough travel history should be obtained. 1 Canine Multicentric Lymphoma: An Overview WARNING SIGNS Patients with multicentric lymphoma often present with only the clinical sign of enlarged peripheral lymph nodes; however, a patient may present with any number of nonspecific clinical signs, such as lethargy, weight loss, anorexia, or polyuria/polydipsia. To view the CE test for this article, please visit todaysveterinarytechnician.com .

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